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4 edition of A degree-scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background found in the catalog.

A degree-scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background

A degree-scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background

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  • 24 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cosmology,
  • Microwaves,
  • Anisotropy,
  • Background radiation

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesDegree scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background.
    StatementEd Wollack ... [et al.].
    Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA-CR-204888., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-204888.
    ContributionsWollack, Edward J., 1964-, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17564593M
    OCLC/WorldCa39401395

    An experiment for measuring the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on intermediate (8°-0°.5) angular scales is considered. The notion of an optimal experiment is introduced: an experiment is.   NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) - A Degree-Scale Measurement of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background We report the detection of anisotropy in the microwave sky at 3O GHz and at l deg angular scales. There's a problem with your browser or settings. Your browser or your browser's settings are not supported.

    Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB or CMBR) Cosmic background radiation is well explained as radiation left over from an early stage in the development of the universe, and its discovery is considered a landmark test of the Big Bang model of the universe. We present measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy near the stars HR and Phi Herculis from the fifth flight of the Millimeter-wave Anisotropy eXperiment (MAX). We scanned 8\arcdeg\ strips of the sky with an approximately Gaussian 0\fdg5 FWHM beam and a 1\fdg4 peak to peak sinusoidal chop.

    A measurement of the degree scale anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is described. Two High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier-based radiometers provide frequency coverage from 26 GHz to 46 GHz in 6 frequency bands and two polarizations. The observations were made from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in January and February of   We present results from a first test of the Gaussianity of degree-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy. We investigate Gaussianity of the CMB anisotropy by studying the topology of CMB anisotropy maps from the QMAP and Saskatoon experiments. We also study the QMASK map, a combination map of the QMAP and Saskatoon data. We measure the genus from .


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A degree-scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background Download PDF EPUB FB2

The WMAP objective was to measure the temperature differences in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies then were used to measure the universe's geometry, content, and evolution; and to test the Big Bang model, and the cosmic inflation theory.

For that, the mission created a full-sky map of the CMB, with a 13 arcminute resolution via multi-frequency Rocket: Delta II The cosmic microwave background radiation is an emission of uniform, black body thermal energy coming from all parts of the sky.

The radiation is isotropic to roughly one part inthe root mean square variations are only 18 µK, after subtracting out a dipole anisotropy from the Doppler shift of the background radiation.

The latter is caused by the peculiar velocity of the Sun relative. We report the detection of anisotropy in the microwave sky at 3O GHz and at l deg angular scales.

The most economical interpretation of the data is that the fluctuations are intrinsic to the cosmic microwave background. However, galactic free-free emission is ruled out with only 90% confidence.

A Degree-Scale Measurement of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Article (PDF Available) in Astrophysical letters & communications February with 22 Reads. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe A full-sky map produced by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) showing cosmic background radiation, a very uniform glow of microwaves emitted by the infant universe more than 13 billion years ago.

Colour differences indicate tiny fluctuations in the intensity of the radiation, a result of tiny variations in the density of matter in the early.

Measurements of large-scale anisotropy in the K microwave background radiation are reaching a sensitivity of Delta T/T = in the amplitudes of low-order spherical harmonics. The results of a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at wavelengths between and 2 mm, carried out using a balloon-borne m telescope, are reported.

Recent advances in degree scale anisotropy measurements have allowed us to begin critically testing cosmological models. Combined with the larger scale measurements from COBE we are now able to directly compare data and theory.

These measurements promise future progress in understanding structure formation. Cosmology with cosmic microwave background anisotropy TARUN SOURADEEP Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, PuneIndia E-mail: [email protected] Abstract.

Measurements of CMB anisotropy and, more recently, polarization have. Observing degree-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation over an angular scale from 20 to arcminutes and over a wavelength range from 1 to 12 mm, the ACME experiments have made.

Here, we present measurements of secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) covering the complete deg2 SPT-SZ survey area. Data in the three SPT-SZ frequency bands centered at 95, DOI: ///2/14 Corpus ID: SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP *) OBSERVATIONS: SKY MAPS, SYSTEMATIC ERRORS, AND BASIC RESULTS @article{JarosikSEVENYEARWM, title={SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP *) OBSERVATIONS: SKY MAPS, SYSTEMATIC ERRORS, AND.

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): We present results from a first test of the Gaussianity of degree-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy.

We investigate Gaussianity of the CMB anisotropy by studying the topology of CMB anisotropy maps from the QMAP and Saskatoon experiments. We also study the QMASK map, a combination map of the. We present results from two observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) performed from the South Pole during the austral summer.

Each observation employed a 3∘ peak to peak sinusoidal, single difference chop and consisted of a 20∘×1∘ strip on the sky near our SP91 observations. The first observation used a receiver which operates in 3 bands between 38 and 45 GHz (Q.

The Solar System is moving at km/sec relative to the Universe and we can measure this using the dipole anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB).This was recognized as soon as the CMB was discovered, so experimenters went to work to take data immediately.

We report cosmic microwave background (CMB) power-spectrum measurements from the first deg{sup 2} field observed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at and GHz.

On angular scales where the primary CMB anisotropy is dominant, l {approx}. Figure 2. CMB and Galactic patches, in equatorial coordinates, superimposed on a Q-band all-sky WMAP seven-year temperature map (Jarosik et al. Note that the Galactic-plane temperature signal saturates the color scale.

Patch G-2 is the Galactic center. - "First Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Power Spectra at 43 GHz in the. Results from a search for anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are presented from the third flight of the Millimeter-wave Anisotropy experiment.

The CMB observation occurred over hours and covered a sq deg area of the sky where very little foreground emission is expected. Significant correlated structure is observed at 6 and 9/cm. We report on the preliminary result of a search for anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with a beam size of ~^deg^ FWHM over a wavelength range of mm.

The system operated successfully for hr at the South Pole during the austral summer. The data from one region, representing 25 hr after editing, are presented here.

Get this from a library. A degree-scale measurement of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background. [Edward J Wollack; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.;]. The first predictions of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) were published shortly after the CMB was discovered by Penzias & Wilson ().

Sachs & Wolfe () calculated the anisotropies due to gravitational potential fluctuations produced by density perturbations ().Because the density perturbations are given by the second derivative of the gravitational potential.Results from a search for anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are presented from the third flight of the Millimeter-wave Anisotropy experiment.

The CMB observation occurred over hours and covered a sq deg area of the sky where very little foreground emission is expected.The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of only a few physically observable remnants of the early Universe. Studies of the spectrum, polarization and spectrum, q, with an emphasis on degree-scale anisotropy measurements.

Anisotropy measurements are notoriously difficult, so this discussion is prefaced with a review of the receiver.